Asking the Right Questions

Selling is all about asking questions. No matter what type of selling methodology you use, strategic selling, soft selling, consultative selling, door-to-door selling, you ask questions that provide you with the information you need to discover if there is a need for your product/service; to make sure you are talking to a decision maker who has the authority, the budget, the need and a sense of urgency to want to solve his/her problem; to allow you to offer the most appropriate solution that addresses all of the buyer’s needs and concerns; to close the deal. You ask questions. And not just any questions, you ask the right questions. Other wise nothing will ever happen.

In a recent article on ERE.net, Kevin Wheeler asked the question “Do We Need Internal Recruiting at All?” and judging from the comments received from both internal recruiters, talent managers and RPO consultants, Wheeler certainly got the talent community engaged.

In order to answer this question, Wheeler asks some follow-on questions that every business leader, talent manager and RPO consultant should be asking. Here are those questions.

  • Does internal recruiting do something that an external provider cannot do?
  • Can it do it at least as cheap or as fast?
  • Can it provide a higher-caliber candidate?

These questions should be asked by business leaders who are always looking for improvements, efficiencies and better return on investments from all of their business processes, such as accounting, manufacturing, sales, human resources and recruiting. If the answer to any of these is “NO”, then steps should be taken, decisions should be made that will benefit and contribute to the success of your company, division or department

Successful talent managers and internal recruiters should be asking themselves these same questions, and be able to respond with information and analysis that will demonstrate the strategic value that the internal recruiting function brings to the company. If the answer to any of the questions is “NO”, then steps should be taken to develop a plan that once implemented can demonstrate your worth to the company.

For those of us in the Managed Recruiting Services business, we should be asking these questions of every potential client. These questions should be part of our needs analysis, information gathering process. These are our RIGHT questions. If the answer to any of these questions is “NO” then you now have an opportunity to discuss with the client some possible solutions and close the deal.

Wheeler suggests that, unfortunately, most business leaders or talent managers rarely ask these questions themselves. If you were asked these questions, what would your answer be?

I will be waiting for your reply.

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