Acknowledging the Elephant in the Room

Over the past few months there have been numerous articles, blogs and commentaries related to handling the increased volume of candidates applying for positions; the continued lack of response from companies once someone applies for a position and what if anything candidates can do; and suggested new “tools” for addressing these issues. Companies complain, candidates complain and vendors develop and market services and technology to address the complaints.

Meanwhile, the big elephant is still in the room and no one seems willing to acknowledge it. So what is the big elephant? It is the hiring process and more specifically, the piece that usually starts the process, the job posting.

HR Leaders, Talent Acquisition Managers and corporate recruiters should understand that you control the process, and thus the flow of candidates responding to open positions. Write and post a poorly written job description that has little or nothing to do with what the job actually is; write and post qualifications for the job that are often more wish-list than actual must haves to be successful in the job; require the candidate do nothing more than attach a cover letter and resume if interested and you have created a situation that is doomed to failure and will always produce a flood of candidates that you can continue to complain about. You have created busy work, not work that leads to a successful outcome, finding the best talent for your positions.

Too harsh? Not by a long shot. The truth is that candidates have no skin in the game. Candidates with a click or two of their mouse (and remember, elephants are deathly afraid of mice) can send their resume and cover letter, doing exactly what you asked them to do, and because so many of them do so, you are inundated with a flood of candidates that you can’t easily manage. You complain and because of the volume of applications, the candidates get very little or no attention and they complain.

And because both sides have issue with the process, the companies that provide technology or services come to market with solutions for the problem that should never have been a problem in the first place.

Here are some suggested steps to remove the elephant from the room.

  • Job postings should have more to do with the actual work the candidate will be expected to do, short term (first 90 days) and long term (see Lou Adler’s Performance Profiles). Candidates could read the posting and decide that they could or could not do that job.
  • Job qualifications should be listed as must haves and nice to haves and the must haves should require the candidate to do something to demonstrate that he/she has it. If the job requires “good written communication skills” because the candidate will be writing and sending out proposals then have the candidate write a proposal. Some will decide not to apply at this point. If the job requires the ability to develop and deliver PowerPoint presentations to groups, have the candidate prepare a PowerPoint presentation around a topic related to what the company does.
  • Once the candidate has applied, have a system that allows the candidate to check the status of application, identifies where the application is in your pipeline and provides information on next steps, requirements and timeframes. (see Gerry Crispin’s April Fools Letter)

I am convinced that taking these steps will eliminate the volume of candidates applying (only those willing to put in the effort to apply will do so), will eliminate the complaints from neglected candidates and provide your company with a pool of qualified, interested candidates from which to interview and hire.

And, as for those service providers who have been developing products that address all the complaints some will go on to other problem areas, others, like our company will be there with you to help you manage a true well functioning talent acquisition and retention process.

Any one see an elephant in the room now?

 

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2 responses to “Acknowledging the Elephant in the Room

  1. Recruiting through job postings is not productive, efficient, or suitable to the economic conditions and recruitment cycle-times we face in the brave new world. You make some very good points in this posting. But the focus on job postings and the assumption that what your write in those postings has an impact on the behavior to the applicant is misguided.

    This is not “recruiting” in the way I understand that word. It’s “applicant processing”. Recruiting requires identifying the ideal candidate profile and reaching out to people who fit that profile and marketing the opportunity, screening for KSA’s, attitude, and “fit” and then working with the Dept. Head on making a decision. If you reach out with Job Postings, you must ensure they reach the target audience only (and not unqualified people). Media segmentation and internet tools can do that.

    The elephant in the room is the fact that the process of changing jobs has changed as the work itself has fundamentally changed- project focused, customer focused, not “permanent”, lacking in benefits and career development options.

    It’s not a bad thing, it’s just different than what we dealt with before.

  2. Bob, thanks for the comments. Perhaps there are multiple elephants in the room that need to be acknowledged. The “job posting” elephant just seemed to be the largest and the most removable. Your last comment regarding process change is true, if only those folks who write job postings believed it, or at least acknowledged it.

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